Novel writing–What to do when your story stalls out

Compass (1)There’s nothing like halfway through your story getting that sickening feeling in the pit of your stomach because you see an inevitable roadblock ahead. And then…you hit it. You run out of words, ideas and the story is just stuck.

Help I can’t think of anything else to say!

For most of us this is the point where we stop; we pull away from the computer, get up and do something else…anything else. Sigh.

The question becomes: what made the story dry up? Why the stale mate? Is it the story or is it…us? In fact, it could be a combination of many things. This is the point where we must stop and look back. Start with the story first because, honestly it is the most benign and arguably the easiest to fix.

Where was I going with this? 

Let’s face it, every story should be headed somewhere. There are reasons you started writing the novel in the first place; there was a point you were trying to make, so to speak. Retrieve it from your memory, go back, read what you have written and ask yourself if in fact you ventured down an alternate path. (umm what if I turned here?) It could be that halfway through the story you discovered an exciting new direction, and that may be O.K. But if you began with one thing in mind and the story took off in a different direction, this will become a problem.  Your readers will become lost. There may be some heavy editing involved at this point so that the story will flow without obstruction.

There are too many subplots.

There’s nothing more convoluted and frustrating than a novel that has ten characters and ten subplots. Trust me, if you’re getting twisted, your reader will too. Sometimes you just have to clean it up. And it may be that all ten subplots are essential to the theme. Take a second look; they probably are not. It is exhausting to try to keep up with too many people and story lines. Additionally it becomes cumbersome to write and keep the momentum going.

There is too much information.

Details are good, but too many can halt your story like a traffic cop. Again if they are a burden for you to write, imagine what it will be like for your reader. Sometimes it isn’t what you give, but the way it which you give it. Give less, but in high concentration– kind of like Espresso.

What if it’s me?

Yes, chances are the story is fine; it’s tight and well-written so far. Good. Maybe it is you. Perhaps you’ve lost the momentum or something is going on in your life which has dried up your creative juices. Then yes, walk away…literally. Take a walk and clear your head. Take a few days away from writing and regroup, rethink. Give. Do something for someone else. Sometimes less attention on yourself and more focus on others will provide clearer focus. Meditate, not to empty your thoughts but to be present in the moment. Embrace where you are at this very moment.

Now what?

Make a decision to except this moment and move on or change some things in your life. There’s nothing like imbalance to stall your writing. First remember writing fiction demands a lot of you. Also remember your story needs you and it needs you to be whole. Start again when you are ready. The world is waiting to hear what it is you have to say.

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About Dorcas Graham

I have been a professional writer for more than 20 years; primarily technical writing and freelance journalism. My passion for fiction writing brings me here. Now I have the opportunity to pursue what I love! My debut novel, In Three Days is now available on Amazon.com and Barnesandnoble.com. I'm happy to share this exciting journey with you. In addition to updates of what's happening, I will also add tidbits of information and writing tips I have learned along the way. I welcome your comments. Enjoy!
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